Monday, July 24, 2017

4 Wrong Reasons not to have Earthquake Insurance

According to the latest reports, only about 17% of homes in California are covered by earthquake insurance. So what about the remaining 83%? Are they in denial or have they weighed to risk factors and made a rational choice?

It Won’t Happen To Me

To not dwell on the possibility of tragedy striking is human nature. We see images of people whose lives have been destroyed by natural disasters and feel sympathy for them – a sympathy that is tinged with relief that it happened to the other guy. We live in the hope that such things will not happen to us. That is what so many in Northridge thought before the 1994 quake. To know the extent of the risk all that is required is the read the U.S. Geological Survey’s reports on the likelihood of a major temblor hitting California. Optimism, unsupported by fact, is no reason to not have earthquake insurance.

Rational Decisions – The Common Mistakes


  • My home survived the last quake just fine. Every earthquake is different and the next one could be much worse. Also, new fault lines are being discovered and the next one to be found could be under where you live. What happened last time will have no effect on what could happen the next time.
  • My home is bolted to the foundation. This will reduce the risk of damage, not eliminate it. Even bolting cannot offer complete protection. In addition, studies show that bolting is most effective in single storied wood framed structures. Homes that have 2 or more stories or have large picture windows are likely to suffer damage, even if they are bolted to the foundation.  And if the ground gives way below the foundation, bolting will be of no help.
  • State and federal assistance will get me back on my feet. This assistance is meant only to help survivors cope with the aftermath of an earthquake. It is not going to cover the cost of rebuilding a home and the lives of those who lived in it. The low-interest FEMA loans that may be available are just that – loans that have to be paid back and while they are outstanding, they become liabilities on your personal net worth.
  • I’ll just give the keys to the bank and move on. The problem with this course of action is that allowing the bank to foreclose on an earthquake damaged home will mean a complete loss of equity. In addition, your credit rating will be negatively impacted, making it difficult, perhaps even impossible, to arrange financing for a new home.

It Could Happen At Any Time

Thinking about the possibility of losing a home is not scaremongering. It is being realistic. Of all the material possessions, the home is the most difficult to replace. If you do not have earthquake insurance, the right thing to do is to contact an insurance professional to understand in detail the risks, the potential loss, how earthquake insurance can protect you and how much it will cost. To put it simply, your home protects your family and insurance protects your home.

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